Duncan Racing axle nut

Pankz

Member
Mar 9, 2017
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California
Maybe someone can help. I've bought a whole new rear end and bought this sweet stainless axle nut with two set screws to replace the twin stock nuts.

I'm trying to find a proper torque down procedure for this style nut. I tried emailing them and haven't received a response. What do I torque the nut to the carrier at, and then what to torque the Allen bolts too.
 

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I have a aluminum one like that and it also didnt have any info with it. Emailed Modquad and got a reply.

Got a reply from Modquad.

The axle nut itself you just want to go snug up against the hub, if you go too tight it will work its way loose. The two allen bolts just make sure they are tight and equally so otherwise one may work its way loose.

mod_15_dou_loc_axl_nut.jpg
 
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I have a aluminum one like that and it also didnt have any info with it. Emailed Modquad and got a reply.

Got a reply from Modquad.

The axle nut itself you just want to go snug up against the hub, if you go too tight it will work its way loose. The two allen bolts just make sure they are tight and equally so otherwise one may work its way loose.

mod_15_dou_loc_axl_nut.jpg
Did you use the pin to crank yours down to the carrier or just hand snug it? I'm guessing it needs a little torque down from the pin they provided. Did you locktite anything? Nut or bolts? How many hours have you had on yours and is it working as intended? Haha, sorry for so many questions. Thanks for your quick response already
 
I am not a big fan of those aluminum nuts on a stock axle. Two stock nuts when tightened properly works just fine. These aluminum ones utilize those 2 set screws which in return starts to booger and destroy the axle threads. Especially when they come loose. You need to find the happy medium when setting the correct amount of pressur on the carrier bearings. Torque isn't going to matter on the 2 little screws as they are going to mark the threads regardless.
 
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I am not a big fan of those aluminum nuts on a stock axle. Two stock nuts when tightened properly works just fine. These aluminum ones utilize those 2 set screws which in return starts to booger and destroy the axle threads. Especially when they come loose. You need to find the happy medium when setting the correct amount of pressur on the carrier bearings. Torque isn't going to matter on the 2 little screws as they are going to mark the threads regardless.

Maybe you are referring to a different style locknut. The one I pictured from DRI tightens up exactly like your gear shifter, just threads instead of splines. The bolts don't come in contact with threads, they clamp the axle nut itself against the axle.

It looks like the aluminum nut pictured works the same way.

It's too bad these companies don't provide proper torque procedures. Little iffy in my opinion.

Thanks for the help guys, if I hear back from DRI I will post the response.
 
Yeah Dualstroke, you are thinking of the nuts that have a setscrew against the thread. I had one like that on my Raptor. Rusted and seized in, I couldn't loosen off the setscrew or even drill it out (setscrews are hard). I heated the whole nut red hot to try to soften and free the setscrew, and used a reverse drill and impact driver and HSS bit to try to back it off. It did mangle the axle threads so that I had to clean them up and buy a new nut.

181582_10150134022305803_6539465_n.jpg

The dual nut system works well when done right. A bit of med strength locktite is useful under the outer locknut, (mainly to keep rust from forming in my opinion). It is commonly done, so I always use propane torch heat to help remove the nuts. Just enough to get oil to smoke. It will melt the locktite without damaging the nut or axle.
545791_10151004900335803_324923315_n.jpg

534703_10151068882915803_1317996014_n.jpg


The nut that Plankz is talking about is split and clamps tight. They come in many styles:
AXLENUT-NEW-AXN-D-resized.jpg

DR-AxleNut-Banshee.jpg

241-14041-rad-l-4-rad-loc-axle-nut-banshee-blaster-tri-z.jpg

I've used them a lot in industry and as a replacement on my 660 Raptor.

They are an excellent nut in either steel or aluminum.
Markblaster's description is pretty good. Due to the fine thread you have a lot of mechanical advantage on the bearings and spacer sleeve. Too much pressure is not needed and in some cases could damage the spacer sleeve, binding the bearings. Too much pressure on the lockscrews could strip or break both the steel or aluminum nuts.

So, clean the axle threads, spin the nut on, tighten the lockscrews up so all play is gone but the axle nut spins freely by hand. Spin it up against the bearing, then use the tool to tighten the nut up snug, without marking it or bending the rod or damaging the holes. Then tighten the lockscrews up evenly with a standard allen key. No extenders or grunts or sweat needed. You're good.

No locktite is needed with this system, although I tend to use the medium strength stuff around here as a rust preventative because of the salty environment. Locktite only on the lockscrews. Antisieze or rustproofing on the axle threads. Hope this helps.
 
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Yeah Dualstroke, you are thinking of the nuts that have a setscrew against the thread. I had one like that on my Raptor. Rusted and seized in, I couldn't loosen off the setscrew or even drill it out (setscrews are hard). I heated the whole nut red hot to try to soften and free the setscrew, and used a reverse drill and impact driver and HSS bit to try to back it off. It did mangle the axle threads so that I had to clean them up and buy a new nut.

181582_10150134022305803_6539465_n.jpg

The dual nut system works well when done right. A bit of med strength locktite is useful under the outer locknut, (mainly to keep rust from forming in my opinion). It is commonly done, so I always use propane torch heat to help remove the nuts. Just enough to get oil to smoke. It will melt the locktite without damaging the nut or axle.
545791_10151004900335803_324923315_n.jpg

534703_10151068882915803_1317996014_n.jpg


The nut that Plankz is talking about is split and clamps tight. They come in many styles:
AXLENUT-NEW-AXN-D-resized.jpg

DR-AxleNut-Banshee.jpg

241-14041-rad-l-4-rad-loc-axle-nut-banshee-blaster-tri-z.jpg

I've used them a lot in industry and as a replacement on my 660 Raptor.

They are an excellent nut in either steel or aluminum.
Markblaster's description is pretty good. Due to the fine thread you have a lot of mechanical advantage on the bearings and spacer sleeve. Too much pressure is not needed and in some cases could damage the spacer sleeve, binding the bearings. Too much pressure on the lockscrews could strip or break both the steel or aluminum nuts.

So, clean the axle threads, spin the nut on, tighten the lockscrews up so all play is gone but the axle nut spins freely by hand. Spin it up against the bearing, then use the tool to tighten the nut up snug, without marking it or bending the rod or damaging the holes. Then tighten the lockscrews up evenly with a standard allen key. No extenders or grunts or sweat needed. You're good.

No locktite is needed with this system, although I tend to use the medium strength stuff around here as a rust preventative because of the salty environment. Locktite only on the lockscrews. Antisieze or rustproofing on the axle threads. Hope this helps.

Yes thanks, exactly the info I was looking for, and more!